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Hygiene is a casualty at Niloufer Hospital

Hygiene is a casualty at Niloufer Hospital
Highlights

It goes without saying that hospitals and other healthcare facilities have to take care of the special requirements of patients confined to beds, and also that the toilets in the premises must be spick and span. However, Niloufer Hospital stands in stark contrast to these prerequisites.

Stinking toilets, overflowing urinals and choked dustbins are giving patients and attendants at the hospital a really tough time

It goes without saying that hospitals and other healthcare facilities have to take care of the special requirements of patients confined to beds, and also that the toilets in the premises must be spick and span. However, Niloufer Hospital stands in stark contrast to these prerequisites. Dustbins in the toilets are choked with litter, the urinals are overflowing and standing near the foul-smelling toilets for more than 10 seconds is next to impossible.

In short, patients are suffering due to bad hygiene. Patients complain that the toilets are washed only once a day. But the Resident Medical Officer (RMO) of the hospital claims that the toilets are cleaned every so often. The hospital fails to supply drinking water and instead blames it on the visitors, saying that the facilities meant for the patients are drained away by the visitors.

Sujatha, a patient in the maternity ward of the hospital, shared a detail or two about the unclean bathrooms. “The bathrooms are horrible. They are cleaned once a day,” she said. Sujatha’s mother-in-law, who is taking care of her, complained there is no water to drink.

Lalitha from Nalgonda said, “I have come here to take care of my daughter who has come for her delivery. There is no drinking water and the taps in the bathrooms, too, run dry. We are charged Rs 5 each time we use the bathrooms outside the ward.” Laxmi, a resident of Nandyala, said, “My daughter delivered three days ago.

The hospital lacks the basic facilities and the entire place is unhygienic. We are glad that the hospital doesn’t charge money for treatment but family members are not allowed to meet either mother or baby until the gatekeeper is bribed.” Dr Sivaranjani, RMO, said, “Many people come to visit the patients and they use the toilets and it gets untidy. We can’t restrict the number of visitors as it is not a private hospital. The urinals overflow sometimes but we do clean it.”

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