Indian superstitions that are based off scientific explanations

THE HANS INDIA |   Jun 15,2018 , 11:52 PM IST

While most superstitions seem ridiculous & bizarre, apparently, some of them have seemingly logical explanations behind their origin

Apparently a bad day awaits you if a black cat crosses your path. Or maybe even if you washed your hair on Tuesdays and Thursdays


Sounds weird, right? Now, get this 

While most superstitions seem ridiculous & bizarre, apparently, some of them have seemingly logical explanations behind their origin


Using lemon and chillies prevents you from buri nazar.

Origin: 

Considered to be the most common totka in Indian society, this practice derives its logic from the fact that the cotton thread passing through lemon and chillies absorbs acids, Vitamin C, and other nutrients.

Logic: 

The thread later releases these nutrients into air through slow vaporization which has significant health benefits and works as a natural pesticide.


Sweeping the house after sunset causes poverty.

Origin: 

Back in those days when there was no electricity, and light of lamp was not enough to spot small gold ornaments while sweeping. 

Logic: 

So, our ancestors thought that chances of sweeping the valuables away with dust were high. Do we still have any such reason?


Throwing coins in fountains and rivers brings good luck.

Origin: 

Most currency in ancient times was made of copper and by throwing copper coins into rivers, our forefathers apparently ensured that they were consuming pure water. 

Logic: 

Science has it that copper has antimicrobial properties and it can kill 99.9% of infection causing bacteria. 

However, today we neither use copper coins nor do we drink water directly from rivers. This belief has brought in more pollution than good luck.


Not stepping out, or eating during an eclipse keeps negative energies at bay.

Origin: 

While the sun emits UV rays all the time, it is just that during an eclipse more UV radiations reach us. 

Our ancestors never had access to sunglasses and so it became a popular belief to avoid looking at or going out during an eclipse. 

Logic: 

With all kind of technologies at our disposal, it doesn't makes sense for us to not view a rare and beautiful natural phenomenon.


Eating curd and sugar before stepping out turns out to be lucky.

Origin: 

No doubt, it has become a ritual for years; but, it probably has nothing to do with good luck. 

Unless someone can support this claim... 

Logic: 

The consumption of curd has a cooling effect on the stomach and sugar added to it provides instant glucose.


Lizard falling on a person brings misfortune.

Origin: 

Lizards generally found in our homes release poisonous chemicals from their body in order to protect them from their enemies. 

Logic: 

If a lizard comes in contact with a person’s body or falls in food items, then is bound to make it contaminated and cause diseases.


Chewing on Tulsi leaves is disrespectful to Goddess Lakshmi.

Origin: 

Earlier people used to believe that one should swallow Tulsi leaves and not chew them as the plant represents Goddess Lakshmi. 

Logic: 

According to science, the Tulsi leaf contains an amount of arsenic and thus chewing it directly can cause degradation of our tooth enamel.