Visakhapatnam: Usual 'sparkle' goes missing this Diwali

Diyas designed for Diwali
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A differently-abled person displaying assorted diyas designed for Diwali on Beach Road in Visakhapatnam Photo: A Pydiraju

Highlights

  • The pandemic redefines the manner in which festivals are celebrated
  • As people are steadily getting accustomed to the ‘new normal’, they are still not in a frame of mind to spend beyond the requirement
  • Usually in Visakhapatnam, the count of the crackers’ outlets crosses 250 during the festival. But this time, it paints a gloomy picture

Visakhapatnam: Like most of the cities, Diwali gets louder than usual in Visakhapatnam a few days ahead.

In contrast, the sparkle goes missing this year as many refrain themselves from splurging. Eventually, the pandemic has redefined the way we celebrate festivals. It has largely influenced the spending pattern of the people as strict budgets gain significance more than ever.

As people are steadily getting accustomed to the 'new normal', they are still not in a frame of mind to spend beyond the requirement.

With business units inching towards normalcy, many are not keen on venturing into big endeavours. Even the informal sector, who rely on the seasonal business, refrain from taking any risk as they predict low sales of fireworks this Diwali. In Visakhapatnam, the count of the crackers' outlets crosses 250 during the festival. But this time, it paints a gloomy picture.

Given the poor air quality, a total ban on use of firecrackers has been imposed in New Delhi. Fears of a second wave looming large coupled with 'not-so-conducive' winter season, health officials recommend to consider safety measures and keep the celebrations low-key.

In Visakhapatnam, most of the revellers opt for an in-house celebration, decking up home with 'diyas', candles and flowers. To suit the festive season, entrepreneurs come up with eco-friendly models. MD Roshini, a differently-abled person, is glad that she is not only able to give life to 100 earthen lamps in impressive shapes and hues but also market them on the Beach Road. Trained by Prajwal Vani Welfare Society, Roshini is one among 38 differently-abled persons and a couple of visually-impaired students who designed over 800 lamps and candleholders for Diwali.

Catering to customised festive needs, M Yegna Priya, founder of Gnapika Arts and Crafts, provides tailor-made options, comprising handmade diyas.

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