Do, Due

Do, Due
Highlights

Sweet is the breath of morn, her rising sweet, / With charm of earliest birds; pleasant the sun, / When first on this delightful land he spreads / His orient beams, on herb, tree, fruit and flower, / Glistening with dew; fragrant the fertile earth / After soft showers, and sweet the coming on…”– by John Milton 

Sweet is the breath of morn, her rising sweet, / With charm of earliest birds; pleasant the sun, / When first on this delightful land he spreads / His orient beams, on herb, tree, fruit and flower, / Glistening with dew; fragrant the fertile earth / After soft showers, and sweet the coming on…”– by John Milton

Do, due, and dew are homophones: sound the same but have different meanings.

Do is a verb, an irregular verb: its past tense and past participle are did and done respectively (do-did-done), and has multiple meanings.

When you do something you are performing something, make, get something done, carry out, or acting upon a task in order to achieve: you do cooking in order to feed yourself and your family, and there is a minority of people who do nothing.

Do also means spending time in a jail.

People who did jail also get elected in Indian electoral arena!

Do as a noun refers to a party, bash, or brawl.

And, sometime, do is used to indicate ‘ditto’.

Do forms several phrasal verbs, and idioms: did a (Gandhi did a service to the humanity by promoting non-violence), do a bunk (to flee), do a disappearing act (disappear or vanish: Ponzi schemes run by people do a disappearing act after collecting money from people!),

imperatively, do as I say and not as I do; do away with (cut off, end, terminate), and do bears or does bear shit in the woods is an idiom which is an humour offensive way of saying that the answer to the question is yes.

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