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Proper efforts could have brought back Kohinoor

Proper efforts could have brought back Kohinoor
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Reacting to the government’s stand before the Supreme Court that the British East India Company did not take away the Kohinoor diamond but it was gifted to Britain by Maharaja Duleep Singh, former Deputy Director,

Hyderabad: Reacting to the government’s stand before the Supreme Court that the British East India Company did not take away the Kohinoor diamond but it was gifted to Britain by Maharaja Duleep Singh, former Deputy Director, Archaeology and Museums of AP, Jogi Naidu, said that if the government made concerted efforts the precious Kohinoor diamond could have been back in India.

Talking to The Hans India, Jogi Naidu said that the Centre should constitute an expert committee to prepare an authentic document with dates and facts about the origin of Kohinoor. The panel should also look into how the diamond had changed hands before it landed in the London Museum.

Narrating the history behind the precious diamond, Jogi Naidu said, “The 106-carat Kohinoor diamond was originally found in 13th century when Marco Polo visited Kauluru mines (now Kolleru) in Krishna district in Andhra Pradesh.

From then onwards it changed several hands starting with Kakatiya Pratapa Rudra Raju, Malwa kings and Allauddin Khilji. It later went into the hands of Gwalior kingdom and then to Babar.

In 1739 when Nadir Shah destroyed Delhi, he wanted that Shah Alam exchange the turbans. The diamond which was in Shah Alam’s turban fell down then. Finally in 1812, the diamond went into the hands of Ranjit Singh who lost to British army.

He gave it to British Queen.” In the backdrop of this, Naidu said the Centre should strongly come out against the argument of British that the diamond does not belong to India.

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