LVPEI hosts eye care awareness walk-'Let's Combat Myopia'!

LVPEI hosts eye care awareness walk-‘Let’s Combat Myopia’!
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LVPEI hosts eye care awareness walk-‘Let’s Combat Myopia’!

Highlights

Myopia, or near sightedness, is when our eyes cannot focus light correctly and distant objects appear blurred. Some of the early signs of Myopia are – children straining or squinting the eye to see distant objects, complaining of headaches and frequent change in eye power.

Myopia, or near sightedness, is when our eyes cannot focus light correctly and distant objects appear blurred. Some of the early signs of Myopia are – children straining or squinting the eye to see distant objects, complaining of headaches and frequent change in eye power. Children with myopia often have trouble reading the blackboard at school and will hold their books or objects very close to their face or watch TV from a very close distance.

L V Prasad Eye Institute, hosted an Eye care awareness walk with the theme 'Lets combat myopia', to sensitise public on Myopia in children, today from L V Prasad Eye Institute, Banjara Hills. The walk was flagged off by pediatric eye patients, Dr Ramesh Kekunnaya, Head, Child Sight Institute and Dr Pavan Verkicharla, Head, Infor Myopia Centre, L V Prasad Eye Institute; graced the occasion.

The current digital ecosystem, especially the COVID-19 pandemic with the increased digital exposure for young children, more indoor-centric lifestyle, involvement in intense near work activities (for entertainment and in strive for academic excellence – excessive homework and attending coaching classes invariably held late in the evening, or before school timing for entrance exams) has robbed school children of sunlight and outdoor activities, leading to myopia. Shorter sleep duration and poor nutrition are also associated with the development of myopia. Children with a family history of myopia (either parents or grandparents with myopia) have a higher risk of developing myopia.

"Undiagnosed and untreated myopia can lead to delayed milestones in children and negatively impact their academic performance, participation in co-curricular activities and social behaviour.

Children having Myopia are at a higher risk of developing retinal detachment, glaucoma, cataract and other eye diseases. Some of these eye disorders can result into irreversible vision loss," says, Dr Ramesh Kekunnaya, Head, Child Sight Institute, L V Prasad Eye Institute.

"Myopia is a serious public health concern. If no anti-myopia measures for prevention and control are initiated, it is projected to affect approximately half of the global population (5 billion) by 2050. At current prevalence rate, 5 out of 10 children (48%) living in urban regions of India are likely to have myopia by 2050. Myopia progression is rapid in children who develop myopia at a young age. About 4% of the Indian myopes tend to have complications that can lead to permanent vision loss," says Dr Pavan Verkicharla, Head, Infor Myopia Centre, L V Prasad Eye Institute.

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