Porunai Museum In Tirunelveli Would Be Built At A Cost Of Rs. 15 Crore, Says Stalin

Rice with soil from a burial urn found at Sivakalai Sivakalai in Tamil Nadu’s Thoothukudi district was taken for carbon dating analysis.
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Rice with soil from a burial urn found at Sivakalai Sivakalai in Tamil Nadu’s Thoothukudi district was taken for carbon dating analysis. (Photo/Special Arrangement)

Highlights

  • Chief Minister M.K. Stalin stated in the Assembly on Thursday that the Porunai Museum in Tirunelveli would be built at a cost of Rs. 15 crore.
  • He stated that the discovery shows that the Porunai river in Thamirabarani civilisation traces back 3,200 years.

The Thamirabarani civilisation goes all the way back 3,200 years, according to a carbon dating examination of rice with soil discovered in a cremation urn at Sivakalai in the Thoothukudi district of Tamil Nadu by the Miami-based Beta Analytic Testing Laboratory.

Impressed by this discovery, Chief Minister M.K. Stalin stated in the Assembly on Thursday that the Porunai Museum in Tirunelveli would be built at a cost of Rs. 15 crore. He stated that the discovery shows that the Porunai river in Thamirabarani civilisation traces back 3,200 years. It is the government's responsibility to demonstrate scientifically that the Indian subcontinent's history must commence with the Tamil landscape.
Mr. Stalin stated that digs for Tamil origins would be undertaken out in other states and nations. In the initial phase, research will be conducted in Kerala's old port of Muziris, now known as Pattanam. He added the investigation will be done in collaboration with Kerala archaeologists to determine the Chera empire's age and culture. Vengi in Andhra Pradesh, Thalaikadu in Karnataka, and Palur in Odisha will all undertake similar studies.
While the test report was provided on August 27 by the Beta Analytic Testing Laboratory.
Meanwhile, Mr. Stalin stated that research will be carried out in Southeast Asian countries including as Indonesia, Thailand, Malaysia, and Vietnam, where King Rajendra Chola had founded himself as the supreme ruler.
He mentioned that Professor Susmita Basu Majumdar of Calcutta University had established that the silver currency with the sun and other symbols was pre-Mauryan.
The findings of excavations at Keeladi, Kodumanal, and other sites in Tamil Nadu, according to Rakesh Tewari, former Director-General of the Archaeological Survey of India had also substantiated the perspective that there might have been connectors between south India and north India as early as 600 BCE-700 BCE or even earlier.
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