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RMPs put patients lives at risk

RMPs put patients lives at risk
Highlights

If you haven’t noticed a medical store in the vicinity of the clinic you visit, then its time you notice their existence. Though the nexus between Registered Medical Practitioners (RMP), doctors, pharmaceutical companies, medical representatives and diagnostic centres to earn an ‘extra commission’ is widespread, their practice is going unseen.

RMPs and certain doctors come into agreement with medical stores and pharmaceutical companies so as to increase sales of particular drugs and prescribe medicines that are sometimes unnecessary

If you haven’t noticed a medical store in the vicinity of the clinic you visit, then its time you notice their existence. Though the nexus between Registered Medical Practitioners (RMP), doctors, pharmaceutical companies, medical representatives and diagnostic centres to earn an ‘extra commission’ is widespread, their practice is going unseen.

Sources in the pharmaceutical field indicate that RMPs and medical stores are hand in glove for making a quick buck. Stores in the city offer commissions to RMPs to prescribe a certain set of medicines recommended by them to ensure increase of sales. The practice thrives in urban slums where patients go to RMPs who are known to offer quick fixes instead of doctors. Their greed for money puts the patients’ health at risk as unwarranted medicines are prescribed.

A few daring RMPs not only run clinics without licences or registration but also flout the norms and regulations set by Medical Council of India (MCI). It is reported that RMPs indulge in a nexus with diagnostic centres for monetary gains. They pressurise patients into undergoing unnecessary medical tests, directing them to go to specific labs even for the slightest increase in body temperature or some such problem.

“Healthcare is soon going to be out of reach for the common man. Recently when I went for a check-up, the doctor had diagnosed me with a viral fever and recommended me to undergo different types of blood tests. The test results were negative, of course, but I ended up shelling out Rs 2,000,” said Naresh, a manager at a supermarket. It is also reported that RMPs and doctors get a 30 per cent commission on referring a patient to a particular diagnostic lab.

“The RMPs either opt for cash or goods. The value of the freebies goes higher up when the doctor’s potential of promoting the drug increases,” said a medical representative. “We have a weekly target to comply with. Certain drugs are available in large varieties. In order to increase the sale of these drugs and fight the tough competition, RMPs are lured with freebies. They even start to demand gifts of their choice when there is an increase in the sale of drugs.”

By:Navatha Y

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