Pacifying kids with mobile phones hamper socio-emotional development

Pacifying kids with mobile phones hamper socio-emotional development
Highlights

Pacifying Kids With Mobile Phones Hamper Socio-Emotional Development. A new study has recently revealed that using mobile devices to pacify children may damage their social-emotional development.

New York: A new study has recently revealed that using mobile devices to pacify children may damage their social-emotional development.

Children are using mobile devices more frequently at young ages, but the impact these gadgets are having on the development and behavior of children was still relatively unknown.

Researchers at the Boston University medical Center review the many types of interactive media available today and raise important questions regarding their use as educational tools, as well as their potential detrimental role in stunting the development of important tools for self-regulation

While there are many research studies that have found children younger than 30 months cannot learn from television and videos as well as they can from real-life interactions, there are fewer studies investigating whether this was the case with interactive applications.

Early research suggests that interactive media, such as electronic books and learn-to-read applications can be useful in teaching vocabulary and reading comprehension, but only in children preschool-age or older.

The potential educational benefits for children under 2 years old was questioned, as research on interactive media in this age group was scant, and it was well-known that infants and toddlers learn best through hands-on and face-to-face experiences.

This commentary notes that while mobile device use by children can provide an educational benefit, the use of these devices to distract children during mundane tasks might be detrimental to the social-emotional development of the child.

The authors questioned whether heavy device use during young childhood could interfere with development of empathy, social and problem solving skills that are typically obtained by exploring, unstructured play and interacting with peers.

While much remains unknown, the authors recommend that parents try each application before allowing their children to access it. They also encourage parents to use these applications with their children, as using interactive media together enhances its educational value.

The study is published in the journal Pediatrics.

Show Full Article
Download The Hans India Android App or iOS App for the Latest update on your phone.
More Stories


Top