People In Karnataka's Village Dig Graves To Make Corpses Drink Water

People In Karnatakas Village Dig Graves To Make Corpses Drink Water
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Highlights

  • A village in Karnataka has surpassed all the borders when it comes to superstition.
  • The residents of this hamlet dig graves and put water in the mouths of dead in order to induce rain and placate the "rain gods."

Many people around the world regularly pray to the "rain gods" in an effort to bring rain to their region during dry spells. People even marry animals in several rural areas of India only to attract rain. The majority of these rites are based on superstitions but a village in Karnataka has surpassed all the borders when it comes to superstition.

In Karnataka's Kalakeri village, residents go above and beyond these childish notions. They had their own thoughts and beliefs when it comes to bring rain. The residents of this hamlet dig graves and put water in the mouths of dead in order to induce rain and placate the "rain gods."

There has been an abundance of rain in Karnataka. Due to the severe rain, some places were even impacted by landslides and floods. Strangely, the settlement of Kalakeri didn't get even a drop of rain. At this point, the entire community began to worry, gather, and talk about the "curse" that had been placed upon them. Everyone in the group agreed when someone suggested that they should put water in the corpses' mouths.

The villagers convened, made a list of everyone who had passed away in the previous month, and then went to their cemetery. It was simple to find everyone because the family members knew where these cemeteries were. A water pipe was then inserted into a hole that was about two feet deep and dug to the side where the heads of the victims were lying. The grave was then filled with water from a tanker.

This procedure was repeated on 25 dead bodies. However, it began to shower after the last corpse was finished. As a result, people had a little more faith in this ceremony.

Meanwhile, the story started when Kalakeri hamlet, a small community of roughly 1,500 people, has historically seen extremely little rainfall. However, the origin of this peculiar rite dates back many years. A village elder who passed away with his lips open many years ago. No one shut his mouth before he was buried.

The community was hit by a terrible drought and hunger that year, and the residents suffered. The dead corpse was thirsty, the astrologer claimed when the elders asked him about it. The grave was dug at this time, and the corpse was made to drink water. Then, coincidentally, it began to rain. Following this episode, the locals now do this practise whenever there is a drought or a lack of rain in the village.

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