Ugadi brings joy of get-together

Ugadi brings joy of get-together
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Ugadi brings joy of get-together

Highlights

Ugadi or Yugadi marks the beginning of the spring season and is celebrated as a New Year in the southern states of India like Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh and Telangana. Bhaskaracharya, an Indian mathematician, recognised Ugadi as the beginning of a new year, month, and day in the 12th century.

Ugadi or Yugadi marks the beginning of the spring season and is celebrated as a New Year in the southern states of India like Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh and Telangana. Bhaskaracharya, an Indian mathematician, recognised Ugadi as the beginning of a new year, month, and day in the 12th century.

'Yuga' means 'age' and 'Adi' means 'beginning' which indicates 'The beginning of a new age'. On Ugadi, according to Hindu mythology, Lord Brahma began the creation of the universe. Ugadi commemorates Lord Brahma's creation of humanity on the first day of Chaitra Navratri, a nine-day celebration honouring Goddess Durga's nine incarnations.

"We decorate the house with rangoli and a garland of mango leaves are made specially for the entrance of the house. Neem leaves with an equal amount of jaggery is mixed and served to everyone after the prayers are chanted, this is to signify that life brings us both joy and sorrow.

It's a tradition with science behind it as neem and jaggery are extremely healthy by their inherent nature," says Yashaswi Devanga Shetty.

"The best part about the festival is that we get-together with our family members and cook delicious traditional food. Some of the main customary dishes include Holige and Sour Mango rice. The joy of eating together with your family can't surpass any amount of success," Nithin P.V tells The Hans India.

"It's the beginning of a new year for the South Indian people and every year, I wait for a special drink called Aam Panna which is prepared with sour mangoes. This drink is not just tasty but also helps you stay hydrated and is a great immunity booster.

The markets are usually crowded at this time of the year and the prices are slightly high as the festival is in full swing," says Rashmi Kumari.

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