A paradise to linger on amid concrete jungle

Founder-president of DNCS M Rama Murty explaining the features of insectivorous plants at Biodiversity Park in Visakhapatnam
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Founder-president of DNCS M Rama Murty explaining the features of insectivorous plants at Biodiversity Park in Visakhapatnam

Highlights

The scent of fresh blooms, the sound of chirping birds and the fluttering butterflies spread over a carpet of greenery offer a feast to the eyes to those visiting Dolphin Nature Conservation Society (DNCS) RCD Biodiversity Park in Visakhapatnam

The scent of fresh blooms, the sound of chirping birds and the fluttering butterflies spread over a carpet of greenery offer a feast to the eyes to those visiting Dolphin Nature Conservation Society (DNCS) RCD Biodiversity Park in Visakhapatnam.

From carnivorous plants to exotic species that exist in deserts and the ones that survive in cold regions, the DNCS is a paradise of more than 2,000 plants amid concrete jungle.

Once a desolate site, the two-decade-long Biodiversity Park located at Rani Chandramani Devi (RCD) Government Hospital in Visakhapatnam is a haven for students studying from LKG to PG, researchers, teachers, nature lovers and environmentalists who like to soak in the beauty of the lush greenery.

While the park is a great escapade for nature lovers who wish to take a break from the bustling city life, there are also key takeaways for students who keep frequenting the green zone. And the most significant aspect of the park is that it aids in connecting with nature.

Incepted in 2001, the society carries out umpteen number of activities on nature conservation and environmental protection catering to diverse groups.

Spread over three acres of land, the park has been categorised into 10 sections such as medicinal, aromatic, ornamental, cacti, succulents, gymnosperms, ferns, bamboo grove, aquatic species of plants that sum up to 2,000.

The presence of 125 species of butterflies and 70 species of birds, along with rare and endangered plants such as Gickgo biloba, Dioon spinulosa, Taxus baccata, Cycas beddomei, Melocactus, Golden barrel cactus, orchids, Krishna's buttercup (Ficus Krishnae), cymbidium, among a plenty of other varieties makes the park a sought-after hub for the visitors.

Besides the rare species, the park is dotted with 200 herbal plants such as Aswagandha, Kevakanna, Karpura Tulasi, Sugandhapala, lemongrass, Saraswathi leaf, Jala Brahma, etc.

The RCD Biodiversity Park, the first park of Andhra Pradesh, is a home to a greenhouse (orchidarium), cacti and succulent house, a pond plus an interpretation and training centre.

Marking the completion of its two-decade-long journey, the society initiated a fresh project 'Development of herbal nursery to promote herbal gardens'. "The agenda is to build awareness about the importance of growing plants that possess therapeutic properties among people of all walks of life, primarily students and teachers, employees of organisations, hospitals, government bodies, etc., and encourage them to develop their own herbal garden. These plants help build our immune system naturally and aid in treating common cold, cough, fever and other discomforts we come across in our day-to-day life," explains M Rama Murty, founder and president of DNCS.

Instead of confining the plants to the park, the project aims at reaching out to organisations and institutions and make people organically conscious, the retired Professor adds.

For those who like to connect with nature and also drive home the message of conserving biodiversity, the park provides an apt platform.


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