DU Has Proposed A Separate Entrance Exam Without Specifying The Nature Of It

A students outside Delhi University in New Delhi.
x

A students outside Delhi University in New Delhi.  (Photo/indianexpress)

Highlights

  • Delhi University decided to hold admissions using either the Central Universities Entrance Exam or its own entrance exam.
  • However, there is no clear description for whatever issue this test is supposed to answer.

Delhi University decided to hold admissions using either the Central Universities Entrance Exam or its own entrance exam. Decisions were being made in higher education that will impact the lives of millions of students. The decision was made without any explanation of the nature, character, or goal of the exam. Universities must reevaluate their practises on a regular basis. However, it appears that this conclusion has only been half-considered. Changing admissions standards just a few months before next year's admissions smacks of callous disdain for students, especially in the wake of the Covid disruptions.

A significant decision like this should be made at least a couple of years in advance. However, there is no clear description for whatever issue this test is supposed to answer. The decision was made in the context of a disproportionately large number of students from states such as Kerala being admitted. This exam is supposed to equalise the playing field in some way.

In recent years, we have witnessed students receiving extravagant marks, which has resulted in very high cut-offs, the registrar said in a public statement. This year's entrance exam will provide some respite to students. There will be no pressure from excessive cut-offs. They can prepare by focusing on specific subjects.These justifications are deceptive. Cut-offs have risen to absurdly high levels.

However, believing that a separate entrance exam will solve the problem and provide relief to students defies logic. It adds to the pupils' stress by requiring them to take yet another exam. You now have a situation in which youngsters can thrive in school and on standardised tests but have almost no place to go without the added stress of more exams. While school will continue to be a criterion for admission, its significance will be lessened. Numbers are putting pressure on Delhi University, where the need is considerable, but the number of good colleges is limited. The pressure to score in the top percentage or ranks on exams will continue to exist.

It is still unclear how this exam will be set up or what it'll be used for. Many of our tests, such as CLAT and IIT, are for colleges with two characteristics: They're for a certain course of study, and the goal of the exam is usually to separate the top 1% or even fewer from the rest. In terms of both width and numbers, Delhi University is a larger university.

On the other side, if it is a broad aptitude exam, one must be mindful of the potential dangers. Wherever general aptitude tests are utilised to determine admissions, they are simply one of numerous factors that are considered. It is unclear whether Delhi University is in a position to implement such comprehensive evaluations. As a result, the question of what Delhi University is testing for remains unanswered. While the current system isn't perfect, it's not obvious that adding another exam with no proven educational value will improve.

Show Full Article
Print Article
Next Story
More Stories