Ancient temple infused with bio-energy restored

Ancient temple infused with bio-energy restored
Highlights

In the city recently to deliver a talk at Our Sacred Space, MM Vinod Kumar who coordinated the conservation project explained the restoration process and how temples have a life and should be treated like a human body which has life and energy.

The carpenter looked at the rafter and decided if its time had come, copper plates were tested to see if they had served their purpose and astrologers decided the time for work.

In short, rituals were meticulously followed in the restoration of the 1,000 plus years-old Sree Vadakkunnathan Temple in Thrissur, the cultural capital of Kerala.

In the city recently to deliver a talk at Our Sacred Space, MM Vinod Kumar who coordinated the conservation project explained the restoration process and how temples have a life and should be treated like a human body which has life and energy.

Right from removing a rafter (there are five systems of laying rafters), a tile, termite ridden wood to falling of lime plaster, rituals pertaining to permission of the deities were followed.

Vinod says, “Vasthu and tantrasastra were followed to bring back energy and life in the temple. Everything in the universe has a period and there is a time, so also for the wooden rafters, copper roofs and walls. The concept of bio-energy was followed in the conservation.”

Only traditional materials were used. The carpenters prepared herbal oil in the traditional way to treat wood, lime plaster for walls with a paste prepared with herbs, lime and jaggery. About 300 craftsmen worked for 10 years in phases choosing the appropriate time decided by astrologers.

Lime, copper, timber, granite stone, laterate and copper were predominantly used in the restoration of the multi-complex temple spread over seven acres.

Explaining about the emphasis to stick to traditional design, Vinod says, “Temples in Kerala are not just structures but are seen as living entities that breathe life. The physical and the metaphysical elements went a long way in bringing back the temple to its original form.

Only traditional materials were used and there was no place for chemicals and cement.”
The conservation project was implemented by Cochin Devaswom Board, Archaeological Survey of India and Venugopala Swamy Kainkarya Sabha Trust.

The total cost incurred in restoring the temple was close to Rs 12 crore and took 10 years to complete with 300 traditional craftsmen. Sree Vadakkunnathan Temple perched on the hillock with the Thekkinad maidan hosts the famous Thrissur Pooram, the annual Hindu temple festival.

By:T P Venu

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