Two Muslim students pursue Sanskrit studies; prove languages have no religious barriers

Two Muslim students pursue Sanskrit studies; prove languages have no religious barriers
Highlights

Exhibiting peerless passion for Sanskrit and ‘Bharateeya Samskruthi’ two Muslim students from a traditional religious background are studying the language in Tirupati.

Tirupati: Exhibiting peerless passion for Sanskrit and ‘Bharateeya Samskruthi’ two Muslim students from a traditional religious background are studying the language in Tirupati. Proving that religion has no barriers the two Muslims came all the way from their home state Kerala to Rashtriya Sanskrit Vidya Peeth (RSVP) in Tirupati which resembles communal harmony at its core to accomplish their goal.

Shajin Mohammed Thajudeen, a 21 year student from Trivandrum joined RSVP to get his MA degree in Nyaya Sastra last year after completing his graduation in Trivandrum Sanskrit College. He had his early education up to 10th standard in Dubai where his father was working as an engineer. After his father left the job and returned to his home city, Trivandrum, Thajudeen completed Plus1 and Plus 2 there.

To a question by The Hans India on how he developed an interest in the language Thajudeen replied that Sanskrit has a good tradition. He said that it is a Bharat and not a Hindu tradition. “We cannot discriminate it as Hindu. It is one among several other languages. It is Bharateeya Samskruthi,” he emphasized.

To another question he replied that there was absolutely no objection from his family in his taking up Sanskrit. “But some of the relatives were curious and there were whispers on why I had opted for this language. In RSVP friends and faculty have showed neither discrimination nor partiality.

They have their rituals and customs and they never forced me on anything,” he said and added, “I perform my prayers five times a day and I am now observing Ramzan fast. Nobody here has objected to my observing religious routine”. RSVP has organized a 16-day training camp for the students of Shastras which concluded on 15 June.

Thajudeen also participated in the camp which indicates that Shastras are for humanity and not for religion. Though all the participants are supposed to stay in the same campus during that course, he was allowed to stay outside in order enable him attend to his prayers during Ramzan days.

He even had no problems in getting admission into RSVP. Thajudeen has set his goals for the future too and aims to take up teaching profession after completing MPhil and PhD in Sanskrit. MK Thanseera is another student from Nileshwar of Kasaragod district in Kerala. Also born in a traditional Muslim family, she is one among the four children. Her elder brother is working in DRDA at Pune while another brother is doing integrated MTech in Ranchi Central University. Her sister is an Arabic teacher.

Thanseera completed her BSc with Computer Science, Mathematics and Sanskrit and now wants to pursue MSc in Computer Science or MA in Siddantha Jyothisha in RSVP. She says, “I will not give up Sanskrit. In MSc also I can study Sanskrit. It is ancient language and any one can study it. In fact, Sanskrit is the mother tongue for all languages”.

She described Vidyapeeth as mini Bharath which accommodates students from all parts of the country. It is very easy to learn any language here, she said. “We can be aware of various customs and cultures in the country here by mingling with so many people”, she observed. According to Thanseera the faculty extends tremendous motivation and the atmosphere is very homely here. Thanseera is now eagerly awaiting the Post graduate admission process.

By V Pradeep Kumar

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