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Guntur: Low yield of turmeric may fetch good price to farmers

Low yield of turmeric may fetch good price to farmers
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Low yield of turmeric may fetch good price to farmers 

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Turmeric yield is expected to come down by 15 to 20 per cent this season due to crop damage caused by cyclones last year. The farmers are fearing the less yield would lead to financial loss

Guntur: Turmeric yield is expected to come down by 15 to 20 per cent this season due to crop damage caused by cyclones last year. The farmers are fearing the less yield would lead to financial loss.

Turmeric is being sown in Bhattiprolu, Duggirala, Kolluru, Kollipara, Tenali, Repalle, Achampet and Mangalagiri mandals of Guntur district. The farmers cultivate crops in 4,083 hectares. They get on an average 7 tonnes yield per acre. Due to cyclones in September and October last year, the yield was damaged. The farmers are expecting that they will suffer loss in yield up to 20 percent. They are expecting 5.5 to 6 tonnes per hectare in this season.

The farmers will start harvesting within ten days. The new crop is expected to enter market within ten days. During last year, Andhra Pradesh MARKFED purchased turmeric from the farmers. At present, traders are offering Rs 7,500 to Rs 8,000 per quintal due to increase of demand and fall in production. The price of turmeric is expected to increase further. The officials are in the view that Andhra Pradesh MARKFED may not purchase turmeric from the farmers in this season.

A farmer K Sambasiva Rao said, "Due to cyclones and unexpected heavy rains during last year, turmeric fields were damaged. As a result, the farmers are getting less and inferior quality yield. The traders are offering Rs 7,500 per quintal in the open market. If they offer Rs 10,000 per quintal, we will get back our investment."

Horticulture department deputy director N Sujatha said, "The farmers will get new crop by April first week. They may get less yield by 15 percent. Traders are likely to offer Rs 10,000 per quintal due to increase in demand."

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