Pollution is an eternal pandemic today

Pollution is an eternal pandemic today
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Pollution is an eternal pandemic today

Highlights

The Editorial aptly brought out the approaching environmental disaster that is already in the making, due to fast levels of pollution that seas are enduring, proving in terms of declining catch

The Editorial aptly brought out the approaching environmental disaster that is already in the making, due to fast levels of pollution that seas are enduring, proving in terms of declining catch; and contributing to the sea erosion in many parts of the world. The seas have become virtual dumping grounds of raw human waste and untreated sewage. A stage has come that the sea cannot take any more, and has begun to regurgitate the accumulated toxic waste and pollutants that are effectively killing the flora and fauna of the sea - which is vital for a healthy marine life, unpolluted beaches and healthy ecology.

The fishermen are netting more junk in the catch by way of empty water bottles, discarded napkins and other city waste that are being recklessly thrown into the sea . The shores are littered with similar stuff, and NGOs and self-help groups are feverishly engaged in clearing the debris washed ashore that is ending up to the tune of several truck loads in one go. But, is this the way to tackle the mindless pollution that seas are being subject to, without a definite and long term plan to tackle the menace which is staring at our face as the time is fast running out to tighten our belts to think in terms of more practical and long term measures in avoiding this practice in right earnest.

The government of Kerala announced the other day, the routine, yearly ban on trawling for fifty two days, that will almost run well into the month of July, preventing mechanised boats from fishing in deep seas since the monsoon time is regarded to be the breeding season for fish and other marine life; which may otherwise cause irreparable damage to the sea wealth that are in regular demand. Several such measures, directly or indirectly helped preserve ocean wealth, to some extent from overexploitation.

Turkey's experience of sea coughing up of the phlegm on shores is the story with other countries too, that is less publicised, and people living in such areas have come to put up with, stoically. India has succeeded to a great extent in cleaning the river Ganga, which is now more suitable for a dip and bath, in Kashi and Allahabad. This became possible by preventing city – slaughter - tannery waste entering the river in several cities in UP and Bihar.

It is up to the entire world devising measures in ensuring the long term protection of seas, otherwise it will prove a big folly and global disaster waiting in the wings for the humanity owing to the wrong and improper utilisation of the natural wealth.

— S Lakshmi, Hyderabad

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