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Greta bookies choice for Nobel Peace Prize

Greta bookies choice for Nobel Peace PrizeGreta Thunberg
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Bookmakers seem confident that Swedish teen climate activist Greta Thunberg is a shoo-in for the Nobel Peace Prize to be announced this week, but some experts are more cautious.

Oslo: Bookmakers seem confident that Swedish teen climate activist Greta Thunberg is a shoo-in for the Nobel Peace Prize to be announced this week, but some experts are more cautious.

The 16-year-old has already received Amnesty International's top honour and the Right Livelihood Award, sometimes dubbed the "alternative Nobel", and online betting sites like Ladbrokes now put her as favourite to win what is perhaps the world's most prestigious prize.

In an interview with Swiss broadcaster RTS in August, Thunberg stressed that while the award would be "a recognition for this movement," she and her supporters weren't "doing this to get awards and prizes."

In August last year, she began sitting alone in front of Sweden's parliament on Fridays with a sign reading "School Strike for the Climate". In a little more than a year, she has galvanised millions of young people around the world to take part in demonstrations to raise awareness for action on climate change.

She made global headlines in late September when she lambasted world leaders at the UN climate summit in New York. "How dare you? You have stolen my dreams and my childhood with your empty words," she told them, holding back tears.

But is her impassioned wake-up call enough to earn her the Nobel Peace Prize? "Extremely unlikely," Henrik Urdal, director of the Peace Research Institute in Oslo (Prio), told AFP, citing two reasons for his scepticism.

He argued that while some say climate change might aggravate conflicts in his view there is still no consensus on whether it is actually the cause of armed conflict. He also said her tender age could make the prize more of a burden than a reward.

"The only way I could see that happen is that she would be part of a shared prize like Malala," Urdal said, referring to Pakistani activist Malala Yousafzai, who shared the 2014 prize -- at age 17 -- with Indian children's rights activist Kailash Satyarthi. Norwegian historian Asle Sveen echoed that view.

"Of course she is now an international star, in conflict with Donald Trump, and she put the searchlight on climate change better than anyone else," he said. "What's against her is that she is only 16 years old," he continued, adding that he would be "very surprised" if she got the award.

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