E-waste is a goldmine

E-waste is a goldmine
Highlights

E-waste is a goldmine. As the world is turning into tech-savvy with electronic products and gadgets, there is a growing concern over the E-waste generated that pose serious threat to environment. If disposed of scientifically, 7 to 8 tonnes of gold, 30 to 35 tonnes of silver and 28 tonnes of copper can be extracted from 1.1 million tonnes of E-waste generated annually in India, according to scientists at C – MET.

A national symposium on ‘Sustainable E-waste Recycling Technologies’ held on C-MET’s 24th Foundation Day

Out of 1.1 million tonnes of E-waste, 7 to 8 tonnes of gold, 30 to 35 tonnes of silver and 28 tonnes of copper can be extracted
Hyderabad: As the world is turning into tech-savvy with electronic products and gadgets, there is a growing concern over the E-waste generated that pose serious threat to environment. If disposed of scientifically, 7 to 8 tonnes of gold, 30 to 35 tonnes of silver and 28 tonnes of copper can be extracted from 1.1 million tonnes of E-waste generated annually in India, according to scientists at C – MET (Centre for Materials for Electronics Technology). As part of C-MET’s 24th Foundation Day celebrations, a national symposium on ‘Sustainable E-waste Recycling Technologies’ was organised here on Saturday. The participants, Indian and foreign scientists, emphasised the need for salvaging metals from E-waste.
With regard to E-waste in India, C-MET Executive Director Dr DP Amalnerkar said that there was no proper mechanism to dispose of or recycle E-waste. This could cause severe damage to the environment and human health. Absence of appropriate collection or disposal systems and huge gap between generation and recycling of E-waste was a serious concern, he said.
C-MET, Hyderabad, Director, Dr NR Munirathnam, said that every year the symposium focuses on different subjects concerning people and environment. This year the topic ‘recycling of E-waste’ was selected as India had become one of the largest producers of E-waste. He stressed the need for recycling city’s E-waste on par with Bangalore.
The symposium provided an opportunity to organised and un-organised E-waste recyclers, industry professionals, entrepreneurs and curious students involved and interested in E-waste recycling. The broad range of relevant topics included E-waste management, recycling and recovery, industrial practices and techno-economics and environmental issues of E-waste.
Prof Ramakrishna Ramaswamy, Vice Chancellor, University of Hyderabad presided over the function. While Steven Art, Umicore Precious Metals, Belgium was the Chief Guest. The Foundation Day Lecture on ‘Metals, Algae and E-waste management to Safeguard the Environment was addressed by Prof Ronald Sims, Utah State University, USA.

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