Organic Skincare Products Are Inspired By Baby's Allergies; Mom Earns Rs.5 Lakh Per Month

Organic Skincare Products Are Inspired By Babys Allergies
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Organic Skincare Products Are Inspired By Baby's Allergies (Photo/thebetterindia)

Highlights

  • Due to utilising over-the-counter items such as shampoo and soap, Aishwarya Ravi's kid got rashes in 2015.
  • For Bengaluru-based Aishwarya, 29, seeing her baby's skin break out in furious red rashes caused her to worry.

Due to utilising over-the-counter items such as shampoo and soap, Aishwarya Ravi's kid got rashes in 2015. Her daughter's skin was reacting badly to the creams, even though they were designed for newborns.
For Bengaluru-based Aishwarya, 29, seeing her baby's skin break out in furious red rashes caused her to worry. A paediatrician thentold herto cease putting any products on her daughterafter she was takento the hospital.
Aishwarya's daughterhas an allergy to branded items, and experts suspect that one of the compounds in the components is to blame for her skin's response. Doctors also advised Aishwarya not to wash Aishwarya with soap for the next three weeks, but to use just towels.
A skin-friendly option:
Wanting a skin-friendly alternative to bathing chemicals for her kid, the anxious mother resorted to family traditions that had been passed down for centuries. Use besan flour combined with herbs as a face wash, or mix flowers with oils for hair wash, to name just a few of them.
Using organic ingredients such as cold-pressed oils, besan flour, egg whites, and more, she began producing different powders in her home with the help of her mother. She tested the soaps on me to see how they worked. The oils had a light soapy effect and left her skin feeling silky and hydrated. Her baby was tested after a few days, and she found that it had no adverse effects.
Soon, she wanted to attempt creating shampoos and conditioners for the adults in her family, which she did after a few months. Reading blogs and research papers on the internet led her to take a course in skincare production, which she completed in the spring of 2013. Because of this, she had a better understanding of not just the process of making a product, but also of the interactions between elements.
This was the turning point for her and making shampoo, conditioner and moisturiser at home was her first step. She distributed them to close friends and family members to get their opinion. Everything went well, and they kept asking for more. Her initial thought was to market the items on a smaller basis.
How destiny worked:
She created a Facebook page called Nature's Destiny with her close friend Haarini Sukumaran to promote her work. Bar soap and liquid soap were the only types of soap that were available at the time. It was Aishwarya's job to create the items, while Haarini was in charge of the marketing and shipping to consumers. There were many orders by 2018, and four ladies had been brought on board to aid them with the production process.
As of now, they sell 65 various products, including shampoo and conditioner bars, body washes, body butters, and lip balms, to name a few of them. 750 individuals are customers of the firm, which receives up to 500 orders a month and generates over Rs 5 lakh a month in revenue.
Products are manufactured using organic components from several cities in Tamil Nadu, according to Aishwarya. Despite the fact certain items are designed specifically for children, she says that others are safe for all ages.
When her daughter, now six years old, was asked what her favourite product was out of all of them, she said, "The juicy cherry shampoo bar," since it smells wonderful and looks colourful.
A fitness fanatic from Chennai, Ashish Krishna (31) is a frequent consumer of Nature's Destiny goods. On Instagram, he bought their shampoo bars two years ago, and he still uses them to this day.
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