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Oh my word Arrogance, Pride

Oh my word Arrogance, Pride
Highlights

His pride is justifiable because he earned it with his hard work. But his wife’s arrogance comes from her family’s wealth.

A: I can excuse his pride but not his spouse’s arrogance.

B: Why not?

A: His pride is justifiable because he earned it with his hard work. But his wife’s arrogance comes from her family’s wealth.

Arrogance is display of haughtiness. An arrogant person is someone who displays superiority offending another person or persons. Arrogance is self-importance, egotism, a sense of superiority and an arrogant person is one who displays overbearing pride.

The pupils were astounded by the arrogance of their class leader!

Ravan of the Ramayana thought he was invincible as he possessed gifts from gods but his arrogance destroyed him. The Aam Aadmi Party leader Arvind Kejriwal warned his supporters not to display arrogance. He cited arrogance as one of the reasons for the electoral rout of his political rivals.

“An arrogant person considers himself perfect. This is the chief harm of arrogance. It interferes with a person’s main task in life—becoming a better person.” –Leo Tolstoy

What is the difference between arrogance and pride? Both the words could mean haughtiness but pride could be a positive word unlike arrogance, which definitely signifies negative connotation. Pride can be justified but not arrogance. One can feel proud of one’s achievements but not arrogance.

Pride (noun) is the satisfaction one feels for his or her achievement, possession of something or association with something such as an institution or organization or someone in position of authority or power or held in esteem; an excessively high opinion of oneself; conceit; mettle or spirit in horses i.e. courage or the spirit; pride also refers to a group of lions; to indulge oneself in state of pleasure or satisfaction.

He prided in the achievements of his children. Priding in his accomplishments was never in his behavior. “Vanity and pride are different things, though the words are often used synonymously. A person may be proud without being vain. Pride relates more to our opinion of ourselves, vanity to what we would have others think of us.” ―Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice.

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