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Doctors’ strike not illegal, rules SC

Doctors’ strike not illegal, rules SC
Highlights

The Supreme Court declined to declare strikes by doctors illegal but said it hoped that doctors, being life savers, would not resort to strike.

‘Hope life savers will not resort to strike’

New Delhi: The Supreme Court declined to declare strikes by doctors illegal but said it hoped that doctors, being life savers, would not resort to strike.

The court was hearing a petition by an NGO, People for Better Treatment (PBT), opposing a doctors' strike back in 2012, and seeking that it be declared illegal.
Doctors sitting on a strike (file photo)
The NGO's lawyer, MN Krishnamani, argued that the strike violates provisions in the Medical Council India and MCI should take action against striking doctors.

Chief Justice of India HL Dattu, who was heading the bench, said, "Lawyers also go on strike. There is no point in issuing directions. We should not pass any order which can't be implemented."

Dismissing the PIL, the court, in its order, said, "The relief sought in this PIL is commendable but difficult to grant.
Therefore we express our desire that doctors, being saviours of life, should not resort to illegal strikes."

The PIL was filed in 2012, when a nationwide strike was called by the Indian Medical Association, which was protesting against certain reforms initiated by the Central government in the field of medicine. At the time too, the Supreme Court had declined to interfere in the matter Nitish Katara murder case.

The Delhi High Court asked the city police how many inmates of Tihar Jail are provided 'A' class wards/treatment in government hospitals at state expense, while referring to the number of hospital visits made by the convicts in the Nitish Katara murder case.

A special bench of justices Gita Mittal and J R Midha made the query while hearing arguments on sentence to be awarded to the convicts Vikas Yadav and his cousin Vishal Yadav, in the case.

"How many inmates of Tihar have been admitted to 'A' class wards in government hospitals at government expense?" the bench told the Delhi police.

Advocate Sumeet Verma, appearing for Vikas, sought to explain the same saying "they were not admitted everytime. Most of the time there were only visits."

He also said that on the few occasions when they were admitted, they were given bigger rooms to accommodate their security.

The bench, however, was of the view that each and every sick inmate, if required, should be given 'A' class wards or treatment and such benefits should not be confined to VIP prisoners.

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