Touring families a 'headache' for BCCI

Touring families a
Highlights

Indian cricketers travelling with their wives, children and nannies have put the BCCI in a state of inconvenience The players have been allowed to have their families with them for two weeks when the tours are lengthy But the BCCI is finding hard to manage it logistically

New Delhi: Indian cricketers travelling with their wives, children and nannies have put the BCCI in a state of inconvenience. The players have been allowed to have their families with them for two weeks when the tours are lengthy. But the BCCI is finding hard to manage it logistically.

According to sources BCCI had faced some problems in Australia - like transporting the players, supporting staff and family members whose number was near to 40. The board hired two buses at times but still found it difficult to manage the strength.

Indian captain Virat Kohli had asked for WAGs to be allowed on the overseas tour. As per reports BCCI had allowed wives to stay with their husbands after the first 10 days of the tour. The board also tried a 'family period', in which the families visited the players for a set period of time, which was different from tour to tour.

It is learnt that the family visits do not cost BCCI much because the cricketers are footing the bills of their families, but it's turning out to be a logistical issue for BCCI.

On Thursday a BCCI official told, "If the team is travelling with less number of members, it is easier to manage. It's easy for BCCI staff to make off-field arrangements. Right from booking tickets to rooms, the entire management of handling the arrangement is with BCCI. It would be a logistical nightmare if this arrangement - of families travelling with the players - continues to be there in England for the entire duration of the World Cup."

Considering the recently concluded Australian tour, BCCI isn't happy that a few Test players who weren't even regulars, travelled with their extended families for almost two weeks. The official further added, "It is difficult to manage all of them together. There is also the problem of arranging match tickets for their families. It has to be regulated. This is not a question of money.”

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