2-month-old baby undergoes successful eye surgery

2-month-old baby undergoes successful eye surgery
x
Highlights

The incidence of rare congenital eye disease known as Congenital Glaucoma is likely to be 20 times higher in children born to parents of consanguineous marriages (close relatives), when compared to cases of non-consanguineous marriages. 

Plea to include Congenital Glaucoma in Arogyasri scheme

Hyderabad: The incidence of rare congenital eye disease known as Congenital Glaucoma is likely to be 20 times higher in children born to parents of consanguineous marriages (close relatives), when compared to cases of non-consanguineous marriages.

Ophthalmologists studying the patterns found increased risk of offspring being born with this condition, where eye's drainage system is not completely developed at the time of birth, leading to blindness.

Studies done on the Parsee community in India also prove that Congenital Glaucoma is common in the community as many Parsees marry among close relatives. Speaking to The Hans India, Dr S A Hussain Naqvi, consulting medical officer at the Secunderabad branch of Dr Agarwal’s Eye Hospital, said that the incidence remains 20 times higher in this kind of cases.

He said that risk amongst the new born is increased to 1 in 500 in cases of ‘consanguineous marriages’, when compared to other marriages, where the risk increases to 1 amongst 10,000 at the time of birth.

In India, most of the Congenital Glaucoma cases go undetected and end up in complete blindness, due to lack of access to proper treatment. “18 percent of the childhood blindness in India is contributed by the Congenital Glaucoma,” he said.

The Ophthalmologist, who successfully performed an eye surgery for Congenital Glaucoma on a 2-month old Toraubally from Mauritius in the City, explained the condition. He pointed out that in a normal eye, a clear transparent fluid called aqueous humor flows through the inner eye continuously.

This fluid flows into the eye and goes out of the eye. In the case of Glaucoma, the fluid enters the eye, but does not exit. Then the fluid accumulates more and more in the eye and the pressure on the eye increases.

According to the doctor, in India, the number of ‘Adult Glaucoma’ cases is on rise, but most of those who face the condition remain averse to find out the real problem with their eyes. Particularly the poor and underprivileged rarely consider going for a treatment, because of the high costs.

The agony is that 90 % of those who were detected with Glaucoma, they are not aware of the ailment. “By 2020, it is presumed that 80 million people will be blind all over the world and India will account for 23 million because of Glaucoma.

If the government includes Adult Glaucoma in the Arogyashri scheme, millions of poor would get benefitted and they can once again see through their eyes,” he added.

Show Full Article
Print Article
Interested in blogging for thehansindia.com? We will be happy to have you on board as a blogger.
Next Story
More Stories