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Keeping Folk Art Alive

Keeping Folk Art Alive
Highlights

The trend of Engineering, Medical and MBAs is fading away as preferences are shifting from the conventional to the unconventional These unconventional streams of education are providing an opportunity to secure a job and to cash into a profitable business too

The trend of Engineering, Medical and MBA’s is fading away as preferences are shifting from the conventional to the unconventional. These unconventional streams of education are providing an opportunity to secure a job and to cash into a profitable business too.

Once aspired to be an engineer, Aman Preet Kaur chose to grow as an artist and pursue her love for painting. Having done her bachelor’s in fine arts from JNAFAU, she went to Visva-Bharati University in Santiniketan to get a Master’s in fine arts.

She has donned different roles as an Art History teacher at Glendale Academy, co-founder for Kilkaari Art Co, and currently she is an Art Consultant for Design House and active with her plans to promote folk art.

Making the best use of available resources, she converted her grandfather’s vacant factory at Sun City in Hyderabad, in 2017, into her personal art studio, Sirjan Hara, a space to display her works of 2D and 3D sculptures and a platform to conduct workshops on folk art.

To encourage people to learn folk art forms, Aman Preet began to conduct workshops taught by folk artisans. Till date she has conducted four workshops and the fifth is planned to be held in January 2019 by Kalamkaari artisans.

Taking a step forward towards promotion of the traditional art, she is creating an exclusive space at her studio for fusion art; her means to support the folk artisans. Speaking with The Hans India, she reveals her future plans for Sirjan Hara. “I am working on fusion art, which will have a presence of my designs blended with folk art forms. For this, I have already connected with nearly 15 artisans from Telangana, Andhra Pradesh and North India. This is my way of giving back to the society through the promotion of folk art.”

At present, she has a network of five artisans from Punjab along with Kalamkari, Kollu Bommalata, Cheriyal, Nakashi, Laakh Choodi, Dockra and others from both the Telugu states.

Giving momentum to this association is the birth o f a new art. Without revealing the details, she promises to surprise all, for which she will hold an exhibition in March, and display her personal creation of sculptures and other products made using her designs combined with that of the folk artisans.

In conclusion, Fine Arts is for those with dedicated interest and passion towards art. Artisans like Aman Preet, inspire children to explore creative field and adapt as a career. Moreover, these days, Indian parents are inclined to opt fine arts as a profession for their children, thus lighting the hope to keep the colours of our country alive.

- Divya Rao

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