Goddess Lajja Gauri sculpture found in Singarayakonda

Goddess Lajja Gauri sculpture found in Singarayakonda
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Highlights

Siddipet: From Ancient history to this hi-tech era, female-worship is certainly a deep-rooted tradition among Indians. Worship of Mother Goddess, also...

Siddipet: From Ancient history to this hi-tech era, female-worship is certainly a deep-rooted tradition among Indians. Worship of Mother Goddess, also known as Lajja Gauri in some parts of the country, had transfigured into various forms in due course of different periods.

The figurines of female divinity have a distinct change in appearance compared to that of those found since the Indus Valley Civilisation to Sanchi Stupa to Badami in Karnataka and the list goes on...

The latest find to this pride collection is the figurine of Mother Goddess sculpted on a half-a-square-foot limestone which was found at Singarayakonda near Koheda mandal headquarters in Siddipet (formerly in Karimnagar) district, 133 kilometres of Hyderabad.

The team from Kotha Telangana Charitra Brindam (KTCB) led by historian and epigraphist Sriramoju Haragopal stumbled upon the sculpture underneath a heap of bricks, believed to be of Buddha stupa, on the hillock. The locals who cleared bricks for the conduct of Narasimha Teertham did not notice the carving.

The partially disfigured lotus-headed carving was affected over time as its hands and ornate decoration disappeared. It may be mentioned here that Singarayakonda (hillock) abutting Mroyu Tummeda (The Humming Bee) vagu (stream) is believed to have witnessed a glorious past with traces of Buddhism during 1st or 2nd century BC still intact. However, it needs archaeological studies to ascertain facts that hold key to human evolution.

According to Haragopal, the mother sculpture found on Singarayakonda is much ancient than that of those found in Badami (Karnataka), Kurnool and Alampur in Jogulamba Gadwal district during the period of 6th to 12 century AD. "The sculptures of Mother Goddess varied from time to time, and place to place.

The one we found on Singarayakonda emphasises the reverence the Mother Goddess have been commanded right from the early days of mankind. It's a centuries-old tradition of worship woven around Mother as a Goddess, who represents motherhood, fertility, creation, destruction," Haragopal told The Hans India.

The appearance of Mother of Goddess or Lajja Gauri, nude and legs apart, is cultic and cannot be seen as pornographic representation, he said.

"Since times immemorial, the tradition of worshipping Mother Goddess, in whatever name it may be, exists in all the villages across the country, manifesting locals' beliefs.

They are also known as village goddesses. In fact, majority of households have space allocated for the Mother Goddess, but they sans idols," he said.

The other team members of the KTCB who accompanied Haragopal are Ahobilam Karunakar, Samaleti Mahesh and Vemuganti Muralikrishna. It may be mentioned here that the same team brought Buddha stupa and four-headed Buddha Brahma on Singarayakonda hillock to lime light a couple of years ago.

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