Many youth sceptical of politics, not keen to vote

Many youth sceptical of politics, not keen to vote
Highlights

The urban voter is a mystery and the youth segment is a category that political parties have begun to think about Urbanites are active on social media and have a say on every political issue but when it comes to cast their vote, there is a perception that they are apolitica

The urban voter is a mystery and the youth segment is a category that political parties have begun to think about. Urbanites are active on social media and have a say on every political issue but when it comes to cast their vote, there is a perception that they are apolitical. The Hans India, spoke to a few. Thirty two percent of the Indian population lives in cities, yet the youth shun politics. Syed Junaid, 23, a CAP employee at Amazon stated, “I don’t find any political party worth my vote as they fail to keep their promises.”

This apathy stems from the fact that the youth generally feel that politicians never keep to their promises, so they is no point in participating in the political process. However, there is also an attitudinal change among the student population. “If we do not cast our vote, we would only help the unworthy candidates,” feels a segment. For instance, Mahesh Kumar, 24 preparing for civil examinations, stated, “It’s time that youngsters vote and make a difference to society. My friends and I have decided to vote this time and make participatory democracy a reality.” Ram S K, a social scientist who has conducted several studies on voting patterns in urban areas and was associated with the Centre for Development Studies, Trivandrum, says, “It is paradox that the average urban voter whose contribution to the gross domestic product by way of knowledge is huge, is indifferent to voting.”

The youth seem to be divided and the indifference to the political process is still a worry. Safa Juveria, 22 who is pursuing B.Ed at Anwaar Ulloom College said, “I am never going to vote. Despite submitting applications, I never received a scholarship. Why should I take the pains and vote. My life is not going to change.”

First timers

While many feel that by casting their vote, nothing much will change, there is a section of youth who are excited to be voting for the first time. The voter identity card is an indication that they can make decisions on their own and that power gives them a high. A case in point is Subhashree Panda, 21, a third year law student at Symbiosis Law School. She says, “I am all excited to vote as it’s my first time.” Echoing a similar sentiment is Abdul Majid, 25 year-old sales employee at Reliance Trends Banjara hills, “I am definitely going to vote as it’s my right and responsibility.”

Pooja Jha, 22 a B Com final year student of St Anns Degree College told, “I am all set to cast my vote.” Aiman Fatima, 21, BA final year at University College for Women told, “I wish my vote would help in getting the right candidate to win.” Swaathi Pandey, 22, B Sc final year at University College for Women, Koti stated, “No, I don’t think I would go to vote.”

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