A modern take on age-old problem

A modern take on age-old problem
Highlights

He is 50+ and she is 26. Yet, sparks fly when the rich lone ranger, a smug, assured financial sector hotshot (Ajay Devgn) becomes the be all and end all for the young engineer girl ( Rakul Preet Singh), who is a part-time bartender and a fun-loving pretty thing.

He is 50+ and she is 26. Yet, sparks fly when the rich lone ranger, a smug, assured financial sector hotshot (Ajay Devgn) becomes the be all and end all for the young engineer girl ( Rakul Preet Singh), who is a part-time bartender and a fun-loving pretty thing. Of course, the man has no issue with the relationship as he justifies it by saying he is not the first one to fall for a girl, who is his daughter's age. The woman, initially flustered, gets hooked with the cool dude who seems to be ticking all the boxes as far as she goes. This, despite friendly warnings by his psychiatrist friend that the relationship is bound to be doomed as it is interpreted as an old man seeking pleasure with a young woman who gets financial security and a future in return for her role in the entire process.

Akiv Ali, an editor-turned-director, keeps the proceedings frothy and does not get into too many guilt trips about the unlikely alliance between his lead pair. The dour expressions of the hero, as he goes about wooing the damsel, is counterbalanced by her effervescent and zippy presence.

Things do take the odd twist and turn when the London-based pair return to India to meet the family of the hero, where the separated wife (Tabu), his children and the bitter parents confront him. The hero has minimal leeway to explain about the new phase of his life as he is not accepted by his daughter whose engagement is underway and his father, taunting him for his irresponsible behaviour. How all things come to a manageable level and how the first relationship turns out to enable the next taking shape forms the climax of the film.

A sluggish screenplay in the final hour with melodrama popping up here and there mars the breezy pace of the film, which would have otherwise been a light-hearted, non-preachy take on unlikely attractions taking place in our society. Tabu salvages the second half pretty well with her stoic performance while the others just occupy screen space to keep the film moving ahead. However, the director needs to be complimented for a bold ending which is the final spark that attempts to enliven a pedestrian overhang at the climax.

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