Tablighi Jamaat: Saudi action 'most unfortunate'

Saudi action ‘most unfortunate’
x

Saudi action ‘most unfortunate’

Highlights

The recent crackdown by the Saudi government on Tablighi Jamaat has drawn strong criticism from various Muslim bodies in Hyderabad. Labelling the revivalist movement as ‘dangerous and deviant’ and calling it a ‘gateway to terrorism’ is unjust and uncalled for, they said.

Hyderabad: The recent crackdown by the Saudi government on Tablighi Jamaat has drawn strong criticism from various Muslim bodies in Hyderabad. Labelling the revivalist movement as 'dangerous and deviant' and calling it a 'gateway to terrorism' is unjust and uncalled for, they said.

Addressing a press conference on Wednesday, members of the Awami Majlis-e-Amal criticised the Saudi authorities for leveling wild charges against the Tablighi Jamaat which is peacefully carrying out the dawah work. "At a time when Islamophobia has gripped the world, the Saudi government's banning of the Tablighi Jamaat and linking it to terrorism is just too bad," said Mujahid Hashmi.

Mufti Tajammul Husain Qasmi, Khateeb, Masjide Husaini, said it was unfortunate that the Tablighi Jamaat was accused of 'biddat' (invention in religion) and misguiding the community. What was most saddening was that these remarks were coming from a place where the Prophet of Islam carried out dawah work throughout his life. "It is painful to see Ahle-haq being labelled as sharpasand," he said.

Jamaat-e-Islami activist, Abdul Khadeer, also faulted the Saudi action. "Calling the faithful to the prophetic ways is banned while immodesty and opening of cinema theatres are being allowed," he said.

Sufi Khairuddin and Prof Anwar also criticised the Saudi authorities and said they ought to have done investigation into the Tablighi Jamaat activities before linking it to terrorism. They felt the Saudi government should prove its allegations as it would have a severe impact on the community which is being targetted by right-wing activists.

Show Full Article
Print Article
Next Story
More Stories
ADVERTISEMENTS