A photographer’s mind’s eye

A photographer’s mind’s eye
Highlights

Photographer Swapan Parekh needs no introduction; he is well-known for his works in Indian advertising and documentary photography. The artiste was in Hyderabad over the weekend for the ‘Indian Photography Festival’ where he shared insightful details from his past during the ‘Artist Talk’ session of the event.

Renowned documentary photographer, Swapan Parekh’s address during the Indian Photography Festival was a welcome insight into his visualisation and inspiration

Photographer Swapan Parekh needs no introduction; he is well-known for his works in Indian advertising and documentary photography. The artiste was in Hyderabad over the weekend for the ‘Indian Photography Festival’ where he shared insightful details from his past during the ‘Artist Talk’ session of the event.

Parekh revealed how he entered the photography field. “My father, Kishore Parekh died when I was at 16. At that time I was studying science and didn’t even know how to handle a camera. But, something happened when he passed away. That day I was decided to become a photographer,” said Parekh.

“Even today, I hear stories about how he revolutionised Indian photography in the 1960s. He was a great photo journalist,” remembered the artiste about his father. Rewinding to his early days in the field, Parekh said, “I studied Documentary Photography in New York in the 1980s. After returning to India, I did a few news and documentary projects. Later, I realised that shooting distressed India for a foreign audience was irritating me. I met art director Prashant Godbole and I worked with him and I created my own style of documentary photography.”

“It is always difficult for a photographer to capture the same photo one more time with same resolution. I don’t compromise with my visual. Today photographers are participating in worldwide exhibitions, which will help them to interact with others. Young photographers have to find a way that supports their photography. Every picture must have a meaning. People always remember the photo instead of the photographer,” opined the artiste.

Speaking about his works, Parekh said, “I have been in this field for more than 35 years now. I did human interest, lifestyle and fashion projects. Some of my works are Baba and the Orphans of Terrorists, Punjab-1994, Mother Teresa and her missioneries-1995, Lost Lives the Latur Earthquake-1993, Death of a Computer, Jaisalmer Cigarettes Campaign, Amitabh Bachchan for Reid and Tailor, Anna Kournikova for Sahara group, Bharath Petroleum, Tata group and Singapore Tourism.

“My current works are Between Me and I, In a Hurry to Nowhere, From Tiny to Teen (It’s about my daughter Saaya),” he added. As with every artiste, Parekh has an inspiration. “Renowned photojournalist Raghu Rai inspired me,” shared Parekh. “Every photographer has to make their own style instead of simulating others. Of course, I made my own choices. Instantaneous recognition inspires me every time. I won’t speak much but my pictures speak. I’m the photo and the photo is me,” he concluded.

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