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Empty classrooms haunt Osmania

Empty classrooms haunt Osmania
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The Osmania University (OU) was the epicenter of the Telangana movement. Although the dust over formation of the new state has settled down, the OU...

As the university was the nerve centre for the Telangana movement, academics was affected. We are making all efforts to educate students about importance of the courses

OU, registrar K Pratap Reddy

Hyderabad: The Osmania University (OU) was the epicenter of the Telangana movement. Although the dust over formation of the new state has settled down, the OU classrooms still lie vacant.

There are 27 odd departments in the University College of Arts and Social Sciences with a total intake of 50 students per course. Though seats in all the departments were filled during counselling, hardly 10-15 students attend psychology, English, economics and journalism classes.

Why?

Several students who hail from the rural background, join the courses for accommodation, mess and library facilities to prepare for competitive examinations, they put academics on the back burner.

“Many students who join the college aim to secure a government job and I am no different from them. Where would one get facilities like library, reading room, food and accommodation at a reasonable price under one roof?” questions T Ramesh, a MA Telugu student.

Another student of public administration department, Sambasiva, says that it is the absence of a full time Vice-Chancellor that has hampered academics of the university. He adds, “Due to the Telangana agitation, the entire system got derailed and students have got used to the system. It is the need of the hour to have a strong VC who should get things back on track.”

Are teachers’ at fault for poor attendance?

A few students claim that professors should be blamed for the poor turnout of students. “Professors do not turn up on time for the classes. Instead of waiting for the professors, we can spend time in the library preparing for the competitive exam,” says a student.

Deepak of MA Sociology department adds, “It’s a never ending saga. Although the classes have to start by 9 am, they begin an hour late every day, as professors come late. Apart from that, my department lags behind in Wi-Fi and computer facilities.”

Students also lament that academic consultants have poor communication skills.

The professors however rebuke that it is the other way round. “Every student in the Arts College has some political affiliation. They don’t attend classes and demand attendance as well marks in the examinations. If we do not oblige, they rough us up,” says a senior professor of MCJ department.

“It is mandatory for every student to have a minimum attendance of 75 per cent to sit for final examinations. Since the university officials were lenient over attendance during the Telangana movement, the same practice is being continued in every department of the Arts College. The students view that attending classes is not mandatory as they can sit for examination even with zero per cent attendance,” states the professor.

Osmania University registrar K Pratap Reddy says that a circular was issued to colleges making 75 per cent attendance mandatory for every student.

“As the university was the nerve centre for the Telangana movement, academics was affected. We are making all efforts to educate students about importance of the courses. A meeting will be held with the college principals and deans to curb truancy. A stern action will be taken if a student does not have minimum attendance,” he warns.

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