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Campaign for British students to come to India

Campaign for British students to come to India
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Greg Clark, Minister for Universities, Science and Cities has launched a new UK-wide campaign to support 25,000 UK students to come to India over the...

Hyderabad: Greg Clark, Minister for Universities, Science and Cities has launched a new UK-wide campaign to support 25,000 UK students to come to India over the next five years.

The campaign, ‘Generation UK-India’, aims to create a new generation of more globally and culturally aware young people, and will be managed by the British Council. Underlining the UK Government and universities’ ongoing commitment to promoting international opportunities to students across the UK, Generation UK-India would provide opportunities for UK students to either work as teaching assistants in Indian schools, gain work experience at top Indian companies, or go on specially organised cultural immersion courses.The first Generation UK-India placements will begin in summer 2015.

Prof. Furqan Qamar, Secretary General, Association of Indian Universities, said, “Student Mobility programmes, such as the newly launched Generation UK- India, support internationalisation agenda of Indian universities aimed at promoting excellence and building deeper understanding of cultures between Indian and UK students.”

The British Council is in discussions with businesses such as KPMG and BP, who have expressed interest in supporting the scheme.

Lord Bilimoria, founding chairman of the UK-India Business Council, and a programme champion of Generation UK-India, commented, “The world is getting more integrated, more inter-connected, more interdependent. And in that sort of a world you’ve got to be open minded, world aware, outward looking. So we need our students to go out, and experience the world and experience countries like India. That’s going to help our students better themselves, become more competitive and give them the huge advantage in life.”

Rob Lynes, director of the British Council in India, said, "Student mobility is a proven means of building long lasting ties between nations, but currently the UK welcomes around 300 Indian students for every British student going to India. That imbalance needs to be addressed. India is poised to be the third largest economy in the world, and we want to give many more young British people the chance to get a better experience of modern India, and the opportunity to gain a more global mindset."

In August 2014, 200 UK students took part in a two-week cultural immersion course in India, organised by the UKIERI Study India programme. Tom Wyke, 22, a History student from Queen Mary University of London, said, "This programme really allows you to open the door into India in a very unique manner, something you can’t get by backpacking. It helps you to understand a little bit of the culture and get a feel for why it’s such a diverse and special place."

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