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Hindi literary legend on Google Doodle

Hindi literary legend on Google Doodle
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Highlights

A time when girls only future was being housewives and mothers, one women discovered her love for writing and went on to become one of the key figures in a new era of Hindi poetry. Popularly known as ‘Modern Meera’, Mahadevi Varma’s life and work were celebrated by Google Doddle on April 27.

A time when girls only future was being housewives and mothers, one women discovered her love for writing and went on to become one of the key figures in a new era of Hindi poetry. Popularly known as ‘Modern Meera’, Mahadevi Varma’s life and work were celebrated by Google Doddle on April 27.

With a passion for poetry, Mahadevi Varma wrote her way to greatness. Today, we celebrate her fight for the nation’s freedom and her contribution to the Indian Neo-Romantic poetry movement with a #GoogleDoddle. – tweet by Google India.

Mahadevi Varma, a poet, translator, educator, and women’s rights activist who played a major role in the Chhayavad movement (1914-1938) – that refers to the Neo Romanticism of Hindi literature marked by writing that prioritised emotions and the individual experience; a departure from earlier modes of Hindi poetry.

Born in Farrukhabad, Uttar Pradesh in 1907, Mahadevi Varma was encouraged by her parents to complete her education. She began writing poetry when she was pursuing her Master's in Sanskrit. Her talent was discovered by her roommate Subhadra Kumari Chauhan. Both of them grew up as writers owing to the increased acceptance of modern Hindi writing in 1920’s literary circles.

Mahadevi Varma wrote around 30 books of poems and prose. Her writings were mainly focused on women rights. Her notable works included Neeklanth, Gaura and Gillu. Atteet ke Chalachitra (Sketches from My Past), a short-story collection about the women she met while working as a principal at a girls’ school. Her biography, Mere Bachpan Ke Din, she wrote about how lucky she had been to have be born to a liberal family at a time when girls were considered a burden.

Mahadevi Varma was awarded the Padma Bhushan in 1956. And in 1982 she received the Jnanpith award, which is given to writers who have made an “outstanding contribution” toward regional-language literature. She was presented the award by then British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, who in her speech highlighted Varma’s efforts toward improving education for women while she was principal of a women’s college in Allahabad.

Compiled by Preeti Putti

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