Hebbal-Nagawara Valley Project: Karnataka Biodiversity Board to look into ecological impact

Karnataka Biodiversity Board to look into ecological impact
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Karnataka Biodiversity Board to look into ecological impact 

Highlights

In a meeting with Project Vruksha Founder Vijay Nishanth and Vinod Jacob general manager with Namma Bengaluru Foundation (NBF) the Karnataka Biodiversity Board chairman Anant Hegde Ashisar has stated that he will look into the Hebban-Nagawara Valley project where more than 6,000 trees will be axed to rejuvenate Singanayakahalli lake.

Bengaluru: In a meeting with Project Vruksha Founder Vijay Nishanth and Vinod Jacob general manager with Namma Bengaluru Foundation (NBF) the Karnataka Biodiversity Board chairman Anant Hegde Ashisar has stated that he will look into the Hebban-Nagawara Valley project where more than 6,000 trees will be axed to rejuvenate Singanayakahalli lake.

NBF along with a team of urban conservationists, citizen scientists, nature artists, citizen activists, wildlife enthusiasts and wildlife photographers had made a site visit to Singanayakahalli lake to prepare a report.

In a recent interview with this newspaper, Dr TV Ramachandra from the Centre for Ecological Sciences, Indian Institute of Science (IISc) has stated that the Karnataka Biodiversity Board should intervene and advise the Minor Irrigation department to ensure the mitigation of the environmental damages which could be caused due to axing of more than 6,000 trees to develop Singanayakanahalli lake.

"The group was astonished to find the thick dense forest like foliage and trees with various birds, ant hills, bird nests, snake pits, moths, and butterflies. They also found heavy wildlife traffic in the area also finding a fox carcass in their path. They also spotted peacocks which is a schedule 1 wildlife species on the ground. The forest has been inhabited by all of them and has become a habitat for both plants and animals, including domestic animals from the neighbouring village," NBF stated. The ground team spoke to local cowherds who stated that there are nearly 1,000 cattle grazing on these grounds.

"This supports our observation that this area has been a grassland nurturing cattle herders for their occupation from all surrounding villages. As per their knowledge these trees have been here for more than 30 to 40 years. We completely support the lake rejuvenation project but not at the destruction of the ecology and habitat. The nearby villages need water for their farming and day to day activities. The trees are protecting the catchment area which has been recharging the groundwater for decades," the statement from the NBF read.

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