Hyderabad: Parents in bind as Telugu is made mandatory

Hyderabad: Parents in bind as Telugu is made mandatory
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Parents admitted their children to CBSE, ICSE and IB schools to have Telugu as an optional subject and not mandatory as offered in the State-run schools. By making Telugu a compulsory subject, children can be under immense pressure to understand the subject

Hyderabad: With the State government making Telugu as a compulsory subject for class 10 students of ICSE, CBSE and other boards from the academic year 2022-23, Few parents have raised concern as it will be difficult for their students to cope up with the subject. Meanwhile few parents welcomed the move.

According to parents, they admitted their children to CBSE, ICSE and IB schools to have Telugu as an optional subject and not mandatory as offered in the State-run schools. By making Telugu a compulsory subject, children can be under immense pressure to understand the subject.

Venkat Sainath, joint secretary of Hyderabad School Parents' Association (HSPA), said, "The decision of implementing Telugu as compulsory subject in all the schools is not a right move. Many students will be facing hardship as few of them come from different States. They will not be able to adopt the language easily. There should be a proper plan of action."

H Suresh, a parent said, "As the State government has suddenly taken a decision of implementing Telugu as a compulsory subject, this will be an additional burden on my child. Also, bad marks in one subject can affect the overall result. The government should once rethink on their decision and should have a backup plan for those who are new to the subject."

Krishna, a parent said, "There are two sides of this move. One, that students will be able to learn the local language and another side is that in ICSE, CBSE schools there are many students who come from other States which is going to make it difficult for them to grasp the subject. It will be better if the State government give an exemption for the ones coming from other States."

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