Yellayya riding a cycle rickshaw fitted with LED lamps at the RK Beach Road in Visakhapatnam
Yellayya riding a cycle rickshaw fitted with LED lamps at the RK Beach Road in Visakhapatnam


Visakhapatnam:  Traditional rickshaws are a rarity in the city now. Most of the school children, now riding autorickshaw or taking personal vehicles to school, hardly heard about them.There were more than 10,000 rickshaws in late 70s and slowly the number dwindled as many took to autorickshaws or changed the profession. Only the elderly persons, who have sentimental attachment to their vehicle remained with rickshaw and confined themselves to the Old City.

Highlights:

  • Appanna, a 65-year-old cycle rickshaw puller at One Town area in the city, says life has become tough for him as none rides his rickshaw 
  • Three good Samaritans decided to help a poor rickshaw puller Yellayya of  Poorna Market to earn money from the tourists 
  • They spent Rs 25,000 and redesigned a rickshaw and fitted it with LED lamps
  • Yellayya  has started making money
Appanna, a 65-year-old cycle rickshaw puller at One Town area in the city, said life had become tough for him none rides his rickshaw.  "At one time we ruled all the streets in the city, right from the railway station to  the old post office and from Jagadamba Junction to Convent Junction" says 65-year-old Devudu, who used to ride a rickshaw  and now turned into an auto driver.

In order to survive with the traditional cycle rickshaw, some of them decided to add value and attract the tourists at least if not the locals.Interestingly, three good Samaritans decided to help a poor rickshaw puller Yellayya of  Poorna Market to earn money from the tourists. They spent Rs 25,000 and redesigned a rickshaw and fitted it with LED lamps.

They suggested to him to collect a fare of Rs 25 from each adult  and a  free for children on a ride from the RK Beach to Kurusura Submarine Museum. Yellayya does not remember the names of his donors but started making money.

By Phani Suni