Heat wave in Andhra Pradesh, Telangana for 3 more days

Heat wave in Andhra Pradesh, Telangana for 3 more days
Highlights

Coastal Andhra Pradesh, Rayalaseema and Telangana will reel under severe heat wave conditions for three days, according to IMD predictions. Temperature has shot up to 45 degrees celsius in many places in the coast, five degrees above the normal and some places it was close to 46 degrees.Experts said a thermal trough extending from Rajasthan to Telangana is the main reason for increasing temperatur

Visakhapatnam: Coastal Andhra Pradesh, Rayalaseema and Telangana will reel under severe heat wave conditions for three days, according to IMD predictions. Temperature has shot up to 45 degrees celsius in many places in the coast, five degrees above the normal and some places it was close to 46 degrees.Experts said a thermal trough extending from Rajasthan to Telangana is the main reason for increasing temperatures.

Highlights:

  • Thermal trough extending from Rajasthan to Telangana cited as reason for heat wave
  • Prof Bhanu Kumar says absence of wind and increased humidity is suffocating people

The atmosphere is also still with no wind even to breath, said former head of the department meteorology and oceanography Prof OSRU Bhanu Kumar.Talking to The Hans India here on Thursday, the professor who did extensive studies on climate change, said absence of wind and increased humidity has been suffocating the people in Telugu states.

“Though the temperature in Visakhapatnam is around 35 degree celsius, the heat index (maximum temperature plus humidity) stood at 52, making life miserable to the people, particularly the old and children,” Bhanu Kumar said.Attributing the present climatic conditions to global warming, Prof Bhanu Kumar said excess of carbon dioxide and methane were being generated by both China and India and oceans were unable to convert carbon dioxide into oxygen due to destruction of cyto-planktons in the sea.

The planktons cause the photosynthesis in the oceans, he added.He said oil spills, nuclear and pharmaceutical wastes are killing the marine life, which are crucial for preventing global warming.“Changes are being observed month by month as the temperatures are shooting up every year.

February this year has been the hottest month in 135 years and April second hottest,” he added.Only pre-monsoon showers can bring down the temperatures but they have become scarce. Earlier, April and May were witnessing pre monsoons showers at least thrice in a week but so far one or two spells were recorded during the last one and half months, he said.

“Only onset on southwest monsoons can bring down the temperatures giving relief to both the states,” Prof Bhanu Kumar said.The monsoons, meanwhile, had covered whole of Andaman and Nicobar islands and expected to hit Kerala on May 29.

By KMP Patnaik

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