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Salar Jung Museum benefits from RO plant

Salar Jung Museum benefits from RO plant
Highlights

An RO (reverse osmosis) plant, which was commissioned for the Salar Jung Museum (SJM) in January, is now providing 40,000 litres of purified water to the staff and visitors. On an average 3,000 people visit the museum and during summer the number goes up to 8,000 per day.

An RO (reverse osmosis) plant, which was commissioned for the Salar Jung Museum (SJM) in January, is now providing 40,000 litres of purified water to the staff and visitors. On an average 3,000 people visit the museum and during summer the number goes up to 8,000 per day.

Sponsored by Raju Foundation, the RO plant is seen as a boon to the museum. A Nagender Reddy, director, Salar Jung Museum, said, “The common tank has been separated for the RO and other purposes. The rejected water from the RO plant is used for the gardens. We are expecting a reduction of about Rs 1 lakh in the water bill which usually amounts to Rs 4 lakh per month.”

The stepwell inside the Salar Jung Museum dates back to the Qutb Shahi period

In the past, the staff and visitors were supplied water from domestic water purifiers. But after the RO plant was commissioned there is less wastage during treatment.

Stepwell used judiciously

The stepwell at the rear end of the museum has been supplying enough water for the upkeep of the museum. The museum authorities make sure that they maintain near to full water level in the well as it would be needed in times of emergency. B Srinivas of the engineering section at SJM said that there is a one lakh litre sump close to the well and if that would not be enough the water from the well could be used in an emergency.

 SJM director A Nagender Reddy at the RO plant

The stepwell, which is 70x70 feet, dates back to the Qutb Shahi period. Sajjad Shahid, a heritage activist, says, “There was no source of water for those staying at Darulshifa. It could be the reason why a stepwell came about in the area.” The rainwater from the roof is let out through pipes which end up in a sump. The water is used for cleaning purposes and for watering the plants. The water from the well is used sparingly throughout the year.

By:T P Venu

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